In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

A burial of a woman from the Koban culture with a bronze mirror was found in the Stavropol region

Archaeologists have discovered the grave of a woman 20–25 years old in the north-west of the Stavropol Territory. The accompanying grave goods and funeral rites made it possible to attribute this find to the Western Koban culture and date it to the second half of the 8th century BC. Among the artifacts found, scientists identified… Continue reading A burial of a woman from the Koban culture with a bronze mirror was found in the Stavropol region

Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Archaeologists explored the ancient settlement of Red October-1, located in Taman. As a result of this work, they established that the fortified settlement arose at the turn of the 6th–5th centuries BC and existed until the modern era. Among the rare artifacts discovered at this site were a gray clay lamp in the shape of… Continue reading Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Ancient Tarim people were found among the ancestors of modern inhabitants of the Pamirs

Geneticists investigated the origins of speakers of Turkic and Indo-European languages ​​from Central Asia, for which they sequenced the DNA of 131 people and combined the data obtained with previously published ancient and modern genomes. It turned out that the origin of the Kyrgyz can be modeled from two components: the population of Xinjiang of… Continue reading Ancient Tarim people were found among the ancestors of modern inhabitants of the Pamirs

Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered the burial of a woman in Middle Franconia who died at approximately 40–50 years of age around 600 AD. Among her accompanying equipment was a folding iron chair. This is only the second such discovery from the early Middle Ages made in Germany. This was reported in a press release from the… Continue reading Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

Paleogeneticists have read 30 genomes of ancient inhabitants of Tunisia, central Italy and Sardinia dating back to the Iron Age. In all regions, they found both descendants of more ancient local populations and immigrants from other territories. Thus, in the necropolis near the Carthaginian city of Kerkuan there were the remains of the descendants of… Continue reading The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

In Spain, a half-meter-long ancient Roman phallus was found carved on a building.

Spanish archaeologists discovered a bas-relief depiction of a phallus during excavations at El Higuerón in southern Spain. It was carved on the cornerstone of a large ancient Roman building that scientists are exploring in Nueva Carteya in the province of Cordoba, El Pais reports. Phallic symbols and images were widespread in ancient Rome. They were… Continue reading In Spain, a half-meter-long ancient Roman phallus was found carved on a building.

Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Paleogeneticists have studied the origins of populations whose history is known from written sources. They discovered that the Mycenaeans arose from the mixing of Minoans and migrants whose origins were connected with the Eurasian steppe. However, the famous “warrior with a griffin,” whose rich burial was found in Pylos several years ago, did not have… Continue reading Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

Paleogeneticists analyzed 777 ancient genomes from Anatolia, southeastern Europe and western Asia, spanning the last ten thousand years of human history. Focusing on the Palaeometallic Age, scientists found that there was no gene flow from Europe to Anatolia during the entire Bronze Age. In addition, they clarified the influence of representatives of the Yamnaya culture… Continue reading Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

An ancient treasure found near Kursk was associated with a military cult

Archaeologists examined an early Iron Age treasure discovered near Kursk. It includes five items: two rare bronze bracelets, a bronze mirror, and two iron spearheads. According to scientists, the treasure was buried in the 2nd–1st centuries BC. Perhaps it is associated with a military cult or was a gift to a deceased noble warrior. The… Continue reading An ancient treasure found near Kursk was associated with a military cult