Ornithologists have described a new bird species from the subantarctic islands

Ornithologists have described a new species of bird that lives on the Diego Ramirez Islands south of South America. It is called the subantarctic rayadito. In the past, the local population was thought to be the spiny-tailed rayadito, which is widespread in Chile and Argentina. However, the analysis showed that individuals from the Diego Ramirez… Continue reading Ornithologists have described a new bird species from the subantarctic islands

A shortage of cavities in an Australian nature reserve has forced a gecko to take up residence in a possum's nest.

In the Australian Mongebap Nature Reserve, a gecko settled in the same nest box with a family of slender-tailed possums. This is the first known example of such a neighborhood. According to zoologists, the lizard had to share the same shelter with marsupials due to the lack of old hollow trees, most of which were… Continue reading A shortage of cavities in an Australian nature reserve has forced a gecko to take up residence in a possum's nest.

Physicists directly saw electron vortices

American and Israeli physicists have directly observed electron liquid vortices for the first time. To do this, they forced current to flow through samples of tungsten telluride of complex shape in a hydrodynamic regime. The study was published in Nature. The movement of electrons along a crystal lattice in the presence of an accelerating electric… Continue reading Physicists directly saw electron vortices

Leeches living between Samara and Saratov hid from predators in the shells of live mollusks

Russian zoologists have discovered that two-eyed leeches that inhabit reservoirs in the Volga basin between Samara and Saratov hide from enemies in the shells of living bivalve mollusks. This is the first example of such behavior described in Europe. Previously, leeches living under the protection of mollusks were found only in Asia, Africa and America.… Continue reading Leeches living between Samara and Saratov hid from predators in the shells of live mollusks

An American turned to doctors about whistling in the scrotum

American doctors reported an unusual clinical case in which an elderly patient was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of shortness of breath, facial swelling and a whistling sound from the groin area. The cause was the entry of air through an unknown mechanism under the skin, into the pleural cavity, mediastinum and scrotum,… Continue reading An American turned to doctors about whistling in the scrotum

Botanists have described the first carnivorous plant with underground trapping pitchers

Botanists have described the first carnivorous plant with underground trapping pitchers. The species, called Nepenthes pudica, grows only in the north of the island of Borneo and preys mainly on ants. Probably, moving the pitchers underground allows this plant not to compete with other Nepenthes or survive droughts. A description of the unusual species was… Continue reading Botanists have described the first carnivorous plant with underground trapping pitchers

The moths buzzed like bees and hornets and scared away the owls

Zoologists have discovered that great bats imitate the buzzing sound of stinging insects to scare away predators. The alarm calls of these bats reminded scientists of the noise made by hornets. And the owls, to whom the signals of night bats and the buzzing of bees and hornets were played, perceived all these sounds as… Continue reading The moths buzzed like bees and hornets and scared away the owls

A female pipistrelle crossed 2,486 kilometers from Russia to France and set a migration record for bats

A female forest pipistrelle, ringed in the Darwin Nature Reserve in Russia, reached south-east France within two months. The length of her journey was at least 2486 kilometers. As noted in the magazine article Mammaliathis is a new record for the distance of migration for bats, which usually do not fly further than two thousand… Continue reading A female pipistrelle crossed 2,486 kilometers from Russia to France and set a migration record for bats

The Classic Mayans attached jewelry to their teeth using resin and bitumen.

Scientists from Mexico and the United States examined eight adult teeth of Classic Maya to find out what materials ancient dentists used to fill holes and secure jewelry. It turned out that most often the resin of pine trees was used for these purposes, which was sometimes mixed with natural bitumen or hydroxyapatite for additional… Continue reading The Classic Mayans attached jewelry to their teeth using resin and bitumen.

Chemists have obtained covalent organic nanotubes

Chemists from India and Italy produced covalent organic nanotubes using a reaction between an aromatic dialdehyde and a polycyclic molecule with four amino groups. Nanotubes turned out to be resistant to high temperatures and turned into rings under the influence of ultrasound, scientists write in Nature Chemistry. The most studied structures of all covalent organic… Continue reading Chemists have obtained covalent organic nanotubes