Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

European physicists have studied in detail the interaction of single photons in a photonic crystal waveguide containing a quantum dot. They showed that by varying the duration of the pulses and their delay, it is possible to achieve varying degrees of nonlinearity, as well as control the degree of correlation of light quanta. The study… Continue reading Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Low-temperature phase transitions in ferromagnets are characterized by destruction of the domain structure. In an article in Nature physicists write that for a theoretical description of the dynamics of such transitions, it is necessary to take into account not only microscopic, but also mesoscale symmetry. This discovery indicates the possibility of the existence of non-classical… Continue reading Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Injections of a hormone from the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the development of the genital organs and is commonly used to treat infertility, have been able to improve cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. This was discovered by European scientists who conducted a study on seven young men. After six months of living… Continue reading Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Short breaks during the day helped workers cope with fatigue

Small breaks during the workday help you feel more alert, less tired and more productive. This was found by Romanian psychologists who conducted a meta-analysis of 22 studies published over the past 30 years. Article published in the magazine PLoS ONE. In modern culture, work and personal space no longer have clear boundaries, and more… Continue reading Short breaks during the day helped workers cope with fatigue

Metasurfaces emit entangled photons with variable wavelengths

American and German physicists have fabricated thin metasurfaces consisting of arrays of silicon nanocavities that exhibit spontaneous parametric scattering. They showed that such structures are capable of generating entangled photons. Unlike traditional media used for this, metasurfaces have greater flexibility, which allows the wavelength of the resulting photons to be changed by changing the pump… Continue reading Metasurfaces emit entangled photons with variable wavelengths

The return of bison has made the prairie vegetation more diverse

The reintroduction of bison to areas of the prairie where they once lived but were exterminated by humans has a positive effect on the local flora, American ecologists have found. After analyzing the results of an experiment lasting about thirty years, they found that in the presence of bison, the species diversity of prairie plants… Continue reading The return of bison has made the prairie vegetation more diverse

Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

American bioinformaticians have discovered traces in the genomes of mammals of 15 independent occurrences of new proteins responsible for the viscosity of saliva. According to the findings of the authors of a study published in Science Advancesthe culprit is a region of the genome with a high mutation rate and selection pressure during the evolutionary… Continue reading Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

Paleogeneticists have read 30 genomes of ancient inhabitants of Tunisia, central Italy and Sardinia dating back to the Iron Age. In all regions, they found both descendants of more ancient local populations and immigrants from other territories. Thus, in the necropolis near the Carthaginian city of Kerkuan there were the remains of the descendants of… Continue reading The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

Indian student tried to use friend's skin for biometric authentication

Police in the Indian city of Vadodara have detained two young men for trying to cheat their way into a local railway exam by using a fingerprint. One of the students cut the skin off his finger and gave it to a friend so that he could fool the biometrics system, NDTV reported. In 1877,… Continue reading Indian student tried to use friend's skin for biometric authentication