Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Scientists introduced bacteria into artificial urine and obtained phosphate stones

Polish physicists and chemists modeled the formation of phosphate kidney stones using artificial urine and uropathogenic bacteria. Experiments in vitro in combination with computer modeling showed that the region of optimal pH values ​​(pH-optimum) for the formation of struvite, a component of phosphate stones, lies in the range of 8–9, shifting to the neutral side… Continue reading Scientists introduced bacteria into artificial urine and obtained phosphate stones

Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette

American researchers explained the biochemical basis of the influence of coffee on the effect of smoking the first cigarette in the morning: coffee components block receptors with high sensitivity and enhance the action of receptors with low sensitivity, which require more of the substance to activate, but which give a stronger response. The results of… Continue reading Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette

Half of the cytoplasm was taken from a living cell and its transcript was sequenced

Swiss scientists have proposed and developed a method that allows them to decipher the transcriptome of individual cells without killing them. To do this, they performed a biopsy of the cytoplasm and sequenced the resulting genetic material. Scientists have used this technique to separate different types of morphologically similar cells and describe how the expression… Continue reading Half of the cytoplasm was taken from a living cell and its transcript was sequenced

Global climate change has played into the hands of most infectious diseases

An empirical systematic study conducted by American scientists showed that global climate change associated with the emission of greenhouse gases increases the prevalence of 58 percent of infectious diseases to one degree or another, and decreases it in only 16 percent. The report on the work was published in the journal Nature Climate Change. Continuously… Continue reading Global climate change has played into the hands of most infectious diseases

White storks give up migrating to Africa to live in Spanish landfills

White storks have long stopped in Spain during their autumn migration to Africa. However, now many of them complete their journey here. Instead of continuing their flight, they spend the entire winter in Spanish landfills, feeding on garbage. In addition to the abundance of food, climate change contributes to this – winters on the Iberian… Continue reading White storks give up migrating to Africa to live in Spanish landfills

Zoologists have discovered record concentrations of fin whales off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula

The number of southern fin whales, which were almost exterminated by whalers in the 20th century, has begun to recover. Zoologists came to this conclusion after analyzing the results of expeditions to the Antarctic Peninsula in 2018-2019. Researchers estimate that about eight thousand fin whales gather in local waters to feed on krill, and for… Continue reading Zoologists have discovered record concentrations of fin whales off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula

Fear training causes plasticity in dendrites in mice

Mice trained to fear beeps have changes in the activity of individual dendrites in their amygdala cells, according to a study published in the journal Science. Moreover, plasticity in dendrites during experiments was not always consistent with the plasticity of the cell bodies of neurons. To learn new knowledge or experience, the brain changes the… Continue reading Fear training causes plasticity in dendrites in mice

Anatomy of steel

  The world began to take on its usual shape and speed when, in the second half of the 19th century, industrial methods appeared to mass-smelt steel – the main frame element of any structure: from a bridge to a ship, from skyscrapers to subway tunnels. Engineering tasks require different properties from a metal: ultra-high… Continue reading Anatomy of steel

Superionic iron alloys have been blamed for greatly slowing seismic waves at the center of the Earth

Chinese geochemists have modeled the state of matter in the Earth's inner core based on the assumption that its main component (iron) forms superionic alloys with light elements – hydrogen, carbon and oxygen. The proposed model made it possible to explain the discrepancy between the calculated and measured speed of seismic waves in the inner… Continue reading Superionic iron alloys have been blamed for greatly slowing seismic waves at the center of the Earth