The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

The Danuri probe, which became South Korea's first lunar probe, sent back to Earth the first image of the Earth and the Moon. Thus, engineers confirmed the functionality of the camera, which examined the far side of the Moon from an unusual distance, according to the website of the Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute… Continue reading The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens

Archaeologists reported the results of excavations in Staraya Russa. This season they managed to discover the oldest city necropolis, dating back to the 11th – early 12th centuries, as well as two birch bark letters. In the text of the 54th letter, the author is a certain Donkey. Perhaps this is a version of a… Continue reading Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens

Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Chinese scientists have tested a new method of genome engineering: they have learned to stitch mouse chromosomes together. It turned out that if the chromosomes are not very large, then it is easy to glue them together and get a mouse with an odd number of chromosomes. Such animals can grow up healthy and fertile… Continue reading Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Direct migration trajectories of dead heads indicated the presence of an internal compass

Entomologists have tracked the autumn migrations of death's-head hawk moths across the Alps. It turned out that these moths move in a straight path, adjusting the direction and altitude of their flight depending on where the wind is blowing. As noted in the magazine article ScienceThe findings indicate that death's heads have an internal compass.… Continue reading Direct migration trajectories of dead heads indicated the presence of an internal compass

Relief images of Olmec rulers found in Mexico

Mexican archaeologists have reported the discovery of two stone reliefs that likely depict Olmec rulers. The sculptures, about 140 centimeters in diameter and weighing about 700 kilograms, were carved from limestone around 900-400 BC, according to a press release from the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico. In the tropical valleys of southern… Continue reading Relief images of Olmec rulers found in Mexico

American gull hatched chicks in Nizhny Novgorod

A Delaware gull native to North America has nested in Nizhny Novgorod. Her partner was a local glaucous gull, with which they bred hybrid offspring. According to the BirdGuides website, this is the second case of a Delaware gull breeding in Europe – and the first that has been documented. Birds often fly far from… Continue reading American gull hatched chicks in Nizhny Novgorod

Siberian dogs introduced freshwater food to their diet about 7,400 years ago

Paleozoologists examined the remains of ancient dogs found at monuments in Siberia and the Far East. They found a gradual decline in the animals' body weight during the Holocene era to about 16.4 kilograms, versus an average weight of about 30 kilograms in adult wolves. Analysis of stable isotopes showed that about 7,400 years ago,… Continue reading Siberian dogs introduced freshwater food to their diet about 7,400 years ago

Scientists have identified a Parthian fortress and excavated barracks and a sanctuary in it

Having examined the ruins of the mountain fortress of Rabana-Merkuli in Iraqi Kurdistan, archaeologists came to the conclusion that in the Parthian era there was an important fortified point here that controlled the area at the junction of the mountainous and lowland regions, as well as a cult center. Scientists have suggested that Rabana Merculi… Continue reading Scientists have identified a Parthian fortress and excavated barracks and a sanctuary in it

Female Tasmanian skinks change sex in the womb

Zoologists have discovered that Tasmanian skinks Carinascincus ocellatus change sex in the womb depending on temperature. This reversion goes only in one direction: individuals with a female genotype can acquire a male phenotype, but males do not turn into females. The colder it is, the more males with the genotype of females will be in… Continue reading Female Tasmanian skinks change sex in the womb

The autonomous ship Mayflower crossed the Atlantic Ocean on its second attempt

The autonomous trimaran Mayflower crossed the Atlantic Ocean on its second attempt, partially repeating the route of the original Mayflower, the ship on which English colonists arrived in North America in 1620. The ship experienced technical problems twice, so the route ended in Canada rather than the United States. The original Mayflower was an English… Continue reading The autonomous ship Mayflower crossed the Atlantic Ocean on its second attempt