Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

The burial of a “vampire woman” with a sickle on her neck and a castle on her leg was found in Poland.

Archaeologists have discovered the burial of a “vampire woman” in Poland dating back to the 17th century. An iron sickle lay across the deceased's neck, and there was a padlock on the big toe of her left foot. As reported by Arkeonews, perhaps the reason for the unusual ritual was the appearance of the deceased.… Continue reading The burial of a “vampire woman” with a sickle on her neck and a castle on her leg was found in Poland.

Tea drinking linked to reduced risk of death from all causes

American researchers have found that drinking tea is associated with a decrease in mortality from all causes, and also found a relationship with a decrease in the likelihood of death from cardiovascular diseases, coronary heart disease and stroke. The results of a survey and medical examination of half a million Britons aged 40 to 69… Continue reading Tea drinking linked to reduced risk of death from all causes

People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Scientists from the UK and Germany examined the remains from a collective burial in a well, discovered in the center of Norwich, England in 2004. Radiocarbon dating showed that these people, many of whom were children, died between 1161 and 1216 AD. Paleogenetic research and historical evidence indicate that the remains belonged to Ashkenazi Jews,… Continue reading People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Ornithischian dinosaurs began living in packs already in the Jurassic period

Paleontologists analyzed samples of primitive ornithischians Lesothosaurus diagnosticus, found together in South Africa, and concluded that ornithischian dinosaurs lived in packs as early as the Lower Jurassic. This is the second earliest example of the social lifestyle of ornithischians. The study was published in the journal Palaeontology. Lesothosauruses were small omnivorous dinosaurs that lived in… Continue reading Ornithischian dinosaurs began living in packs already in the Jurassic period

An ancient burial of a girl in a canoe found in Patagonia

Archaeologists have discovered an ancient canoe burial in the Argentine part of Patagonia. It contained the remains of a young and short girl, 17–25 years old, who was buried more than 840 years ago along with a ceramic vessel covered with white glaze and decorated with red geometric designs. This was reported in an article… Continue reading An ancient burial of a girl in a canoe found in Patagonia

Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Bioarchaeologists from Spain and South Africa conducted a study of human and animal bones excavated in a Roman necropolis of the 2nd–3rd centuries AD in Barcelona. It turned out that most often the meat of pigs, large and small livestock was used as offerings, that is, species that were regularly eaten in everyday life. At… Continue reading Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Danish and British researchers have found that since Denmark banned industrially produced trans fats in food in 2003, the number of deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD) in the country fell by about 11 percent. The results of the work were published in the journal PLoS ONE. Trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids are present… Continue reading Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Butyrate, which is produced by the intestinal bacteria Clostridium, may help people with severe peanut allergies. This was discovered by scientists who introduced polymer micelles with butyrate into the intestines of mice and relieved them of allergies. The authors believe that such micelles can also help with reactions to other food proteins. A preprint of… Continue reading Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

A bull of the first prince with an image of Jesus Christ sitting on the throne was found in Tver

Archaeologists have discovered two medieval hanging seals in Tver. One of them belonged to the Novgorod Archbishop Clement, who was on the see in the last quarter of the 13th century. The second – to the first Tver prince Yaroslav Yaroslavich. This 13th-century artifact depicts Jesus Christ seated on a throne and Saint Athanasius. This… Continue reading A bull of the first prince with an image of Jesus Christ sitting on the throne was found in Tver