Chemists have found ideal conditions for the hydrogen borrowing reaction

Chemists from Russia studied the hydrogen borrowing reaction necessary for the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds. They found that it often does not require a catalyst at all, and also developed recommendations for successfully carrying out the reaction in the laboratory. The study was published in the journal Journal of Catalysis. Organic compounds containing an NH… Continue reading Chemists have found ideal conditions for the hydrogen borrowing reaction

Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

German physics teachers made a universal spectrometer in the Czerny-Turner scheme using LEGO constructors and scrap materials. The authors showed that it can be used to study the spectra of atomic emission, transmission, reflection and fluorescence. Reconfiguring the device for different tasks takes a few minutes, and the total cost of the device does not… Continue reading Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

Bushfire smoke raised temperatures in Australia by three degrees

British climatologists studied the distribution of smoke in the stratosphere after bushfires in Australia in 2019–2020. They found that black carbon particles in the smoke increased the average temperature in the lower stratosphere by 0.7 degrees worldwide, with temperatures rising by three degrees over Australia. Additionally, the reaction of smoke and ozone has caused the… Continue reading Bushfire smoke raised temperatures in Australia by three degrees

Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Injections of a hormone from the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the development of the genital organs and is commonly used to treat infertility, have been able to improve cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. This was discovered by European scientists who conducted a study on seven young men. After six months of living… Continue reading Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

American scientists have developed a cloud platform that can assess the severity of pain in black laboratory mice. She analyzes the expression of the animal's face – the position of its nose, ears, whiskers and the degree of squinting of the eyes. Previously, researchers coped with this task manually, but, as the results show, the… Continue reading The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Archaeologists explored the ancient settlement of Red October-1, located in Taman. As a result of this work, they established that the fortified settlement arose at the turn of the 6th–5th centuries BC and existed until the modern era. Among the rare artifacts discovered at this site were a gray clay lamp in the shape of… Continue reading Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Short breaks during the day helped workers cope with fatigue

Small breaks during the workday help you feel more alert, less tired and more productive. This was found by Romanian psychologists who conducted a meta-analysis of 22 studies published over the past 30 years. Article published in the magazine PLoS ONE. In modern culture, work and personal space no longer have clear boundaries, and more… Continue reading Short breaks during the day helped workers cope with fatigue

Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

Physicists from 13 countries presented the results of a study of the relative frequency of production of short-range two-nucleon correlations in the lightest mirror nuclei containing three nucleons. The data were obtained for a certain kinematic range during electron scattering by nuclei. The collaboration found that in light nuclei, neutron-proton pairs are formed approximately twice… Continue reading Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

Australian sports doctors, with the participation of fifty runners, studied how compression socks affect the effects of running on the digestive system. After the marathon, those who ran in knee socks had lower levels of a protein marker of small intestinal damage. In an article published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Researchthe authors… Continue reading Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

The initial height of the tsunami caused by the eruption of the Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai volcano on January 15, 2022 was 90 meters. These conclusions were reached by researchers from the UK, New Zealand, Croatia and Japan, who analyzed changes in atmospheric pressure and sea level and created nine models of a volcanic tsunami.… Continue reading The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.