Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Playing music in childhood has been linked to long-term improvements in cognitive abilities.

Playing a musical instrument in childhood and adolescence is associated with improved cognitive skills in later life, British researchers have found. The positive effect persisted even after adjusting for several factors, such as childhood environment. The study was published in Psychological Science. Developed cognitive skills can influence academic and professional achievements, as well as health.… Continue reading Playing music in childhood has been linked to long-term improvements in cognitive abilities.

The genome of the “immortal” jellyfish has been sequenced

Spanish scientists have compiled a list of genes that are likely responsible for the “immortality” of the jellyfish Turritopsis dohrnii. To do this, they sequenced its genome and compared it with the genome of a jellyfish. Turritopsis rubra. It turned out that the “immortal” jellyfish, unlike its relative, acquired additional copies – up to eight… Continue reading The genome of the “immortal” jellyfish has been sequenced

Insulin pump restores brain structure in diabetic teenagers

Researchers from the United States have found out how different methods of insulin administration affect brain development in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Typically, this disease causes changes in the structure of the brain and leads to a decrease in cognitive abilities. But as it turned out, those who used an advanced insulin pump (which… Continue reading Insulin pump restores brain structure in diabetic teenagers

In Spain, a half-meter-long ancient Roman phallus was found carved on a building.

Spanish archaeologists discovered a bas-relief depiction of a phallus during excavations at El Higuerón in southern Spain. It was carved on the cornerstone of a large ancient Roman building that scientists are exploring in Nueva Carteya in the province of Cordoba, El Pais reports. Phallic symbols and images were widespread in ancient Rome. They were… Continue reading In Spain, a half-meter-long ancient Roman phallus was found carved on a building.

A 19th-century English farmer was accused of invading Australia by rabbits.

Biologists have found out who should be blamed for the environmental disaster caused by rabbits brought to Australia. Genetic analysis has shown that almost the entire local population of these animals descends from 13 wild and domestic individuals and their descendants, which were received from England in 1859 and released on his estate by settler… Continue reading A 19th-century English farmer was accused of invading Australia by rabbits.

Scientists have grown another batch of artificial mouse embryos

Embryologists again raised mouse embryos outside the mother's body. Recently, a group of Israeli scientists conducted a similar experiment and raised baby mice to the eighth day of development. Now the British have obtained approximately the same result – and at the same time verified that the Israeli embryo culture system ex utero works. The… Continue reading Scientists have grown another batch of artificial mouse embryos

Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Chinese scientists have tested a new method of genome engineering: they have learned to stitch mouse chromosomes together. It turned out that if the chromosomes are not very large, then it is easy to glue them together and get a mouse with an odd number of chromosomes. Such animals can grow up healthy and fertile… Continue reading Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Butyrate, which is produced by the intestinal bacteria Clostridium, may help people with severe peanut allergies. This was discovered by scientists who introduced polymer micelles with butyrate into the intestines of mice and relieved them of allergies. The authors believe that such micelles can also help with reactions to other food proteins. A preprint of… Continue reading Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette

American researchers explained the biochemical basis of the influence of coffee on the effect of smoking the first cigarette in the morning: coffee components block receptors with high sensitivity and enhance the action of receptors with low sensitivity, which require more of the substance to activate, but which give a stronger response. The results of… Continue reading Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette