In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

A burial of a woman from the Koban culture with a bronze mirror was found in the Stavropol region

Archaeologists have discovered the grave of a woman 20–25 years old in the north-west of the Stavropol Territory. The accompanying grave goods and funeral rites made it possible to attribute this find to the Western Koban culture and date it to the second half of the 8th century BC. Among the artifacts found, scientists identified… Continue reading A burial of a woman from the Koban culture with a bronze mirror was found in the Stavropol region

Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Archaeologists explored the ancient settlement of Red October-1, located in Taman. As a result of this work, they established that the fortified settlement arose at the turn of the 6th–5th centuries BC and existed until the modern era. Among the rare artifacts discovered at this site were a gray clay lamp in the shape of… Continue reading Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

Archaeologists have examined 4,000- to 5,300-year-old Jomon period pottery discovered in Japan. In five artifacts they found traces of cockroach ootheca. One of them was laid by Japanese cockroaches (Periplaneta japonica), the rest look like smoky cockroaches (P. fulinginosa). Previously, it was believed that the latter species was brought to Japan only in the 18th–19th… Continue reading Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

James Webb finds organic molecules in icy particles around a very young protostar

The James Webb Infrared Space Telescope has reliably discovered a number of organic molecules, including complex ones, in the composition of ice particles in the core of the very young protovesche IRAS 15398−3359. In addition, the telescope examined the structure of one of the outflows of matter from the protostar, which consists of four shells.… Continue reading James Webb finds organic molecules in icy particles around a very young protostar

Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered the burial of a woman in Middle Franconia who died at approximately 40–50 years of age around 600 AD. Among her accompanying equipment was a folding iron chair. This is only the second such discovery from the early Middle Ages made in Germany. This was reported in a press release from the… Continue reading Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

Lipids on ceramics made it possible to clarify the time of existence of the Botai settlement

Scientists conducted a study of lipids on ceramics found in Kazakhstan at two ancient settlements of the Botai and Makhanjar cultures. They found remains of horse fat on many fragments of vessels, and for a number of samples they were able to obtain direct radiocarbon dates. Together with previously obtained data, this made it possible… Continue reading Lipids on ceramics made it possible to clarify the time of existence of the Botai settlement

The water level in the Nile allowed the Egyptians to transport stone to the site of the pyramids.

At the time of the construction of the Giza pyramids, the water level in the Nile allowed the filling of an artificial reservoir near the construction site so that the Egyptians could transport materials from the quarries directly to the construction site. This was confirmed by scientists from Egypt, China and France, who examined sediment… Continue reading The water level in the Nile allowed the Egyptians to transport stone to the site of the pyramids.

Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens

Archaeologists reported the results of excavations in Staraya Russa. This season they managed to discover the oldest city necropolis, dating back to the 11th – early 12th centuries, as well as two birch bark letters. In the text of the 54th letter, the author is a certain Donkey. Perhaps this is a version of a… Continue reading Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens