Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

European physicists have studied in detail the interaction of single photons in a photonic crystal waveguide containing a quantum dot. They showed that by varying the duration of the pulses and their delay, it is possible to achieve varying degrees of nonlinearity, as well as control the degree of correlation of light quanta. The study… Continue reading Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

German physics teachers made a universal spectrometer in the Czerny-Turner scheme using LEGO constructors and scrap materials. The authors showed that it can be used to study the spectra of atomic emission, transmission, reflection and fluorescence. Reconfiguring the device for different tasks takes a few minutes, and the total cost of the device does not… Continue reading Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Injections of a hormone from the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the development of the genital organs and is commonly used to treat infertility, have been able to improve cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. This was discovered by European scientists who conducted a study on seven young men. After six months of living… Continue reading Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Archaeologists explored the ancient settlement of Red October-1, located in Taman. As a result of this work, they established that the fortified settlement arose at the turn of the 6th–5th centuries BC and existed until the modern era. Among the rare artifacts discovered at this site were a gray clay lamp in the shape of… Continue reading Archaeologists have discovered a bronze figurine of Jupiter in Taman

Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

Chemists from Germany, the USA and Denmark have found that substances secreted by human skin lead to the formation of an oxidative field around it. Scientists placed four people in a sealed mock-up office and began ozonizing the air to a level close to the maximum permissible concentrations. The experiment showed that ozone interacts with… Continue reading Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

Engineers have learned to touch the touch screen without contact

Engineers from China and Germany have created the GhostTouch device, which allows contactless control of capacitive touch screens, taking advantage of their design features and susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. The device can accurately simulate taps and swipes in different directions on the screens of many popular smartphones without touching them. Despite the fact that the… Continue reading Engineers have learned to touch the touch screen without contact

Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered the burial of a woman in Middle Franconia who died at approximately 40–50 years of age around 600 AD. Among her accompanying equipment was a folding iron chair. This is only the second such discovery from the early Middle Ages made in Germany. This was reported in a press release from the… Continue reading Burial of a woman with a 1,400-year-old folding chair unearthed in Germany

People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Scientists from the UK and Germany examined the remains from a collective burial in a well, discovered in the center of Norwich, England in 2004. Radiocarbon dating showed that these people, many of whom were children, died between 1161 and 1216 AD. Paleogenetic research and historical evidence indicate that the remains belonged to Ashkenazi Jews,… Continue reading People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Thousand-year-old remains of a man with XXY chromosomes discovered in Portugal

The remains of a man who lived more than a thousand years ago were discovered in Portugal. This adult was found to have a very wide ilium, malocclusion, and maxillary prognathism. Genetic analysis showed that the man had Klinefelter syndrome – he belonged to the karyotype 47, XXY. This was reported in an article published… Continue reading Thousand-year-old remains of a man with XXY chromosomes discovered in Portugal