In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

Archaeologists have examined 4,000- to 5,300-year-old Jomon period pottery discovered in Japan. In five artifacts they found traces of cockroach ootheca. One of them was laid by Japanese cockroaches (Periplaneta japonica), the rest look like smoky cockroaches (P. fulinginosa). Previously, it was believed that the latter species was brought to Japan only in the 18th–19th… Continue reading Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Paleogeneticists have studied the origins of populations whose history is known from written sources. They discovered that the Mycenaeans arose from the mixing of Minoans and migrants whose origins were connected with the Eurasian steppe. However, the famous “warrior with a griffin,” whose rich burial was found in Pylos several years ago, did not have… Continue reading Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

Paleogeneticists analyzed 777 ancient genomes from Anatolia, southeastern Europe and western Asia, spanning the last ten thousand years of human history. Focusing on the Palaeometallic Age, scientists found that there was no gene flow from Europe to Anatolia during the entire Bronze Age. In addition, they clarified the influence of representatives of the Yamnaya culture… Continue reading Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

The earliest farmers formed from three ancestral populations

Paleogeneticists have discovered that the origins of West Asian populations from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic can be modeled from three ancestral groups: the Epi-Paleolithic inhabitants of Anatolia, representatives of the Natufian culture, and hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus or Iran. They also found that the Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Anatolia appears to be associated with a population that… Continue reading The earliest farmers formed from three ancestral populations

Prehistoric Britons crushed rare rock crystal and buried it

Archaeologists have discovered that during the early Neolithic period, Britons from Dorston Hill in western England processed rock crystal and used it to mark their burials. Prehistoric Britons mined rare crystals and moved them over long distances. At the same time, rock crystal was not used to make equipment or weapons, which indicates its symbolic… Continue reading Prehistoric Britons crushed rare rock crystal and buried it

Neolithic Balkan herders hunted roe deer

Paleozoologists from the USA and Croatia examined more than 41 thousand animal bones and teeth found in six ancient settlements in northern Dalmatia. It turned out that during the Neolithic period (about 6000–4700 BC), local residents mainly raised goats and sheep, but over time the share of cattle and pigs increased. Moreover, in the early… Continue reading Neolithic Balkan herders hunted roe deer

An ancient stone slab mentioning the name of the city was found in Gordion

During excavations of the ancient city of Gordion, located in Turkey, archaeologists first discovered an inscription mentioning the name of this Phrygian capital. It was contained on a stone slab dating back to the reign of King Antiochus I Soter (3rd century BC), Daily Sabah reports. This confirms past findings that the ruins found more… Continue reading An ancient stone slab mentioning the name of the city was found in Gordion

Archaeologists have found an image of the mythical hunter Actaeon in Turkey

Archaeologists during excavations of a theater in the ancient city of Prusias ad Gipium discovered a marble block depicting the figure of a man being torn apart by three dogs. According to researchers, this scene represents the famous myth of the murder of the hunter Actaeon by his own dogs, set on him by the… Continue reading Archaeologists have found an image of the mythical hunter Actaeon in Turkey