Ornithologists have described a new bird species from the subantarctic islands

Ornithologists have described a new species of bird that lives on the Diego Ramirez Islands south of South America. It is called the subantarctic rayadito. In the past, the local population was thought to be the spiny-tailed rayadito, which is widespread in Chile and Argentina. However, the analysis showed that individuals from the Diego Ramirez… Continue reading Ornithologists have described a new bird species from the subantarctic islands

Ice-resistant self-propelled platform “North Pole” went on its first voyage

The research vessel North Pole has set out on its maiden voyage, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute said in a statement. It will carry an expedition to the Central Arctic, which will continue the research of the region begun in the 1930s. The 41st Arctic drifting polar station will continue regular research of the… Continue reading Ice-resistant self-propelled platform “North Pole” went on its first voyage

Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

Archaeologists have examined 4,000- to 5,300-year-old Jomon period pottery discovered in Japan. In five artifacts they found traces of cockroach ootheca. One of them was laid by Japanese cockroaches (Periplaneta japonica), the rest look like smoky cockroaches (P. fulinginosa). Previously, it was believed that the latter species was brought to Japan only in the 18th–19th… Continue reading Traces of cockroach ootheca found in Jomon period ceramics

The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

Paleogeneticists have read 30 genomes of ancient inhabitants of Tunisia, central Italy and Sardinia dating back to the Iron Age. In all regions, they found both descendants of more ancient local populations and immigrants from other territories. Thus, in the necropolis near the Carthaginian city of Kerkuan there were the remains of the descendants of… Continue reading The population of the ancient Carthaginian city turned out to be genetically diverse

Zoologists accidentally discovered a new species of deep-sea giant isopods in a Japanese aquarium

Zoologists have discovered a previously unknown species of giant isopod from the Gulf of Mexico, which reaches 26 centimeters in length and has a creamy yellow color. It got the name Bathynomus yucatanensis. As noted in the magazine article Journal of Natural Historythe species was described from a single specimen from a Japanese aquarium, which… Continue reading Zoologists accidentally discovered a new species of deep-sea giant isopods in a Japanese aquarium

Kākāpō numbers have risen to their highest level in almost 50 years. Now there are 252 of them

Kākāpō numbers have reached their highest levels in nearly fifty years. According to a press release from New Zealand's Ministry of Environment, the rare parrots have given birth to 55 chicks this year, bringing the total number of representatives of this species to 252 individuals. By comparison, in 1995 there were only 51 kakapo left… Continue reading Kākāpō numbers have risen to their highest level in almost 50 years. Now there are 252 of them

More than half of species with unclear conservation status are at risk of extinction

Scientists have created a computer model that estimates the extinction risk of species for which there is insufficient data to assess their conservation status. It turned out that more than half of them should be classified as threatened. And among amphibians with unclear conservation status, about 85 percent of species are likely threatened with extinction.… Continue reading More than half of species with unclear conservation status are at risk of extinction

The ancient inhabitants of Libya feasted on watermelon seeds with white bitter pulp.

Biologists examined the genomes of ancient, historical and modern watermelons and found that the most ancient fossil seeds gnawed by people were obtained from fruits with white and bitter pulp. Archaeologists found these samples, more than six thousand years old, at a Neolithic settlement in Libya. These plants were closest to the species Citrullus mucosospermus,… Continue reading The ancient inhabitants of Libya feasted on watermelon seeds with white bitter pulp.

Noble Scandinavians of the Viking Age liked beaver fur

Danish scientists, using microscopy and biomolecular methods, examined 15 samples of fur items found in elite Scandinavian burials of the 10th century. It turned out that several things were made from beaver fur. Since these animals became extinct in Denmark in the Early Bronze Age, this product was brought from other regions, possibly from Rus'.… Continue reading Noble Scandinavians of the Viking Age liked beaver fur

Paleogeneticists read the oldest genome of a domestic horse from America

Paleogeneticists have read the oldest genome of the domestic horse from the Americas. They were able to sequence DNA from a tooth found in an early colonial Spanish town in Haiti. Scientists have confirmed past findings that the first domestic horses of the New World originated from the Iberian Peninsula. This was reported in an… Continue reading Paleogeneticists read the oldest genome of a domestic horse from America