Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

European physicists have studied in detail the interaction of single photons in a photonic crystal waveguide containing a quantum dot. They showed that by varying the duration of the pulses and their delay, it is possible to achieve varying degrees of nonlinearity, as well as control the degree of correlation of light quanta. The study… Continue reading Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Low-temperature phase transitions in ferromagnets are characterized by destruction of the domain structure. In an article in Nature physicists write that for a theoretical description of the dynamics of such transitions, it is necessary to take into account not only microscopic, but also mesoscale symmetry. This discovery indicates the possibility of the existence of non-classical… Continue reading Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Injections of a hormone from the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the development of the genital organs and is commonly used to treat infertility, have been able to improve cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. This was discovered by European scientists who conducted a study on seven young men. After six months of living… Continue reading Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

American scientists have developed a cloud platform that can assess the severity of pain in black laboratory mice. She analyzes the expression of the animal's face – the position of its nose, ears, whiskers and the degree of squinting of the eyes. Previously, researchers coped with this task manually, but, as the results show, the… Continue reading The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

British researchers have refuted the stereotype that people who smoke marijuana are more apathetic and unmotivated. They tested cannabis users and non-users for apathy and anhedonia, and conducted a series of reward-related behavioral tests. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups. A study conducted among adults and adolescents was… Continue reading Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

Chemists from Germany, the USA and Denmark have found that substances secreted by human skin lead to the formation of an oxidative field around it. Scientists placed four people in a sealed mock-up office and began ozonizing the air to a level close to the maximum permissible concentrations. The experiment showed that ozone interacts with… Continue reading Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

Hamsters from the wet slopes of the Andes turned out to be larger than their relatives from the arid plains

Zoologists from Argentina, the USA and Chile have discovered that plateau hamsters Abrothrix hirta from the wet western slopes of the Andes are larger than relatives that inhabit the arid plains east of this mountain range. This pattern is explained by the fact that the abundance of precipitation has a positive effect on the growth… Continue reading Hamsters from the wet slopes of the Andes turned out to be larger than their relatives from the arid plains

Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

Australian sports doctors, with the participation of fifty runners, studied how compression socks affect the effects of running on the digestive system. After the marathon, those who ran in knee socks had lower levels of a protein marker of small intestinal damage. In an article published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Researchthe authors… Continue reading Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

Biochemists have discovered the mechanism behind the red coloration of birds

Biochemists from the USA and Portugal have discovered how in vertebrate cells yellow carotenoid pigments are converted into red ketocarotenoids, which are responsible for the red coloration of some vertebrates. It turned out that this transformation requires two enzymes, and the third, auxiliary, plays the role of a carrier of reacting molecules. The study was… Continue reading Biochemists have discovered the mechanism behind the red coloration of birds