In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

Archaeologists have radiocarbon dated a wooden bow discovered last year in Norway. It turned out that the artifact that melted from under the ice was about four thousand years old. According to researchers, this is the oldest bow ever found in Norway, as they reported on the Secrets of the Ice project Facebook page*. Climate… Continue reading Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

The purpose of masturbation turned out to be different for men and women

Norwegian researchers concluded that masturbation plays a different role depending on gender: in men it often compensates for the lack of sex, while in women it complements an active sex life. The results of the work were published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. Research in recent decades has demonstrated a variety of positive… Continue reading The purpose of masturbation turned out to be different for men and women

Eating cheese potentially improved bone mineralization

Norwegian scientists have found that including 57 grams of Jarlsberg cheese in the diet increases the concentration of total and carboxylated osteocalcin, a marker of bone matrix formation (N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen, P1NP) and vitamin K2 in blood. These changes indirectly indicate an improvement in the process of bone tissue formation and its… Continue reading Eating cheese potentially improved bone mineralization

More than half of species with unclear conservation status are at risk of extinction

Scientists have created a computer model that estimates the extinction risk of species for which there is insufficient data to assess their conservation status. It turned out that more than half of them should be classified as threatened. And among amphibians with unclear conservation status, about 85 percent of species are likely threatened with extinction.… Continue reading More than half of species with unclear conservation status are at risk of extinction

Icelandic Vikings hunted puffins and guillemots

Paleozoologists examined bird bones discovered during excavations of a Viking Age settlement in northern Iceland. It turned out that local residents preferred to hunt puffins and slender-billed guillemots. Scientists believe that the birds were hunted mainly in the summer during the breeding season, after which they brought the prey to the settlement, where they were… Continue reading Icelandic Vikings hunted puffins and guillemots

Observations of relatives helped rats find a treat in an unfamiliar place

Zoologists have discovered that rats easily find a treat hidden in an unfamiliar place if they have previously seen their relative find it there. Thus, these rodents are able to create a mental map of a space they have never been to, focusing solely on observations of the behavior of their relatives. As noted in… Continue reading Observations of relatives helped rats find a treat in an unfamiliar place

Archaeologists have found in Gnezdovo confirmation of written evidence of the funeral rites of the Rus

Russian archaeologists have reported the first results of excavations in Gnezdovo, which began just two weeks ago. While exploring one of the mounds, scientists discovered the remains of a dog cut into three parts. This confirms the written evidence of the Arab traveler Ibn Fadlan, left after visiting Volga Bulgaria in the 10th century, about… Continue reading Archaeologists have found in Gnezdovo confirmation of written evidence of the funeral rites of the Rus

A Norwegian woman accidentally bought a Viking leader's gold ring in a banana box at auction.

A Norwegian woman bought a jewelry lot at an online auction, which was sold in a banana box. Among the usual items was a gold ring dating back to the Viking Age. According to archaeologists, this rare item may have belonged to a Scandinavian leader. This was reported by Science Norway. Traditionally, the period from… Continue reading A Norwegian woman accidentally bought a Viking leader's gold ring in a banana box at auction.

A possible burial site of the Danish king Harald Bluetooth has been discovered in Poland.

Using satellite images, a group of researchers managed to discover the probable burial site of the Danish king Harald I Bluetooth, after whom the Bluetooth wireless technology is named. In the vicinity of the Polish city of Wolin, they found a massive mound, next to which a chapel stood already in the Middle Ages. Back… Continue reading A possible burial site of the Danish king Harald Bluetooth has been discovered in Poland.