Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

European physicists have studied in detail the interaction of single photons in a photonic crystal waveguide containing a quantum dot. They showed that by varying the duration of the pulses and their delay, it is possible to achieve varying degrees of nonlinearity, as well as control the degree of correlation of light quanta. The study… Continue reading Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

A galaxy merger could extinguish a burst of star formation.

Astronomers have found for the first time an example of the result of the merger of two galaxies, where the merger process itself inhibited the formation of new stars, throwing out most of the cold gas reserves from the galaxies. In the case of SDSS J1448+1010, about 47 percent of the material needed to form… Continue reading A galaxy merger could extinguish a burst of star formation.

Ancient Tarim people were found among the ancestors of modern inhabitants of the Pamirs

Geneticists investigated the origins of speakers of Turkic and Indo-European languages ​​from Central Asia, for which they sequenced the DNA of 131 people and combined the data obtained with previously published ancient and modern genomes. It turned out that the origin of the Kyrgyz can be modeled from two components: the population of Xinjiang of… Continue reading Ancient Tarim people were found among the ancestors of modern inhabitants of the Pamirs

The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

The initial height of the tsunami caused by the eruption of the Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai volcano on January 15, 2022 was 90 meters. These conclusions were reached by researchers from the UK, New Zealand, Croatia and Japan, who analyzed changes in atmospheric pressure and sea level and created nine models of a volcanic tsunami.… Continue reading The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Scientists from the UK and Germany examined the remains from a collective burial in a well, discovered in the center of Norwich, England in 2004. Radiocarbon dating showed that these people, many of whom were children, died between 1161 and 1216 AD. Paleogenetic research and historical evidence indicate that the remains belonged to Ashkenazi Jews,… Continue reading People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

American bioinformaticians have discovered traces in the genomes of mammals of 15 independent occurrences of new proteins responsible for the viscosity of saliva. According to the findings of the authors of a study published in Science Advancesthe culprit is a region of the genome with a high mutation rate and selection pressure during the evolutionary… Continue reading Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

Electrical brain stimulation stopped overeating in two patients

Electrical stimulation of the brain has proven to be an effective treatment against overeating and obesity. This was discovered by American scientists who worked with two patients with compulsive overeating disorder. They activated the area of ​​the brain that is responsible for food cravings with an electric current – and as a result, the women… Continue reading Electrical brain stimulation stopped overeating in two patients

Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Paleogeneticists have studied the origins of populations whose history is known from written sources. They discovered that the Mycenaeans arose from the mixing of Minoans and migrants whose origins were connected with the Eurasian steppe. However, the famous “warrior with a griffin,” whose rich burial was found in Pylos several years ago, did not have… Continue reading Paleogeneticists read the genome of the “warrior with a griffin” from Nestor’s palace

Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

Paleogeneticists analyzed 777 ancient genomes from Anatolia, southeastern Europe and western Asia, spanning the last ten thousand years of human history. Focusing on the Palaeometallic Age, scientists found that there was no gene flow from Europe to Anatolia during the entire Bronze Age. In addition, they clarified the influence of representatives of the Yamnaya culture… Continue reading Analysis of 777 ancient genomes clarifies the origins of paleometal populations

The earliest farmers formed from three ancestral populations

Paleogeneticists have discovered that the origins of West Asian populations from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic can be modeled from three ancestral groups: the Epi-Paleolithic inhabitants of Anatolia, representatives of the Natufian culture, and hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus or Iran. They also found that the Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Anatolia appears to be associated with a population that… Continue reading The earliest farmers formed from three ancestral populations