Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

Physicists from 13 countries presented the results of a study of the relative frequency of production of short-range two-nucleon correlations in the lightest mirror nuclei containing three nucleons. The data were obtained for a certain kinematic range during electron scattering by nuclei. The collaboration found that in light nuclei, neutron-proton pairs are formed approximately twice… Continue reading Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

Playing music in childhood has been linked to long-term improvements in cognitive abilities.

Playing a musical instrument in childhood and adolescence is associated with improved cognitive skills in later life, British researchers have found. The positive effect persisted even after adjusting for several factors, such as childhood environment. The study was published in Psychological Science. Developed cognitive skills can influence academic and professional achievements, as well as health.… Continue reading Playing music in childhood has been linked to long-term improvements in cognitive abilities.

The CHEOPS telescope confirmed the discovery of two exoplanets near the “Valley of Sub-Neptunes”

Astronomers using ground-based telescopes and the CHEOPS space telescope have confirmed the discovery of two exoplanets around an orange dwarf close to the Sun. One of the planets is a super-Earth and falls in the poorly explained “sub-Neptune valley”, and the second was classified as a sub-Neptune and is located near the “valley”. A preprint… Continue reading The CHEOPS telescope confirmed the discovery of two exoplanets near the “Valley of Sub-Neptunes”

DNA dating back 30,000 to 70,000 years was found in a Levantine cave.

Paleogeneticists read DNA from Pleistocene sediment samples recovered from Israel's Sephunima Cave. In layers ranging from 30 to 70 thousand years old, they were able to find fragments of mitochondrial DNA from representatives of the deer and hyena families. These are the oldest examples for deposits originating from a region with a climate similar to… Continue reading DNA dating back 30,000 to 70,000 years was found in a Levantine cave.

Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought

Japanese geneticists have proposed increasing the drought resistance of plants using ethanol. They watered Tal's rhizomes (Arabidopsis thaliana) with a weak alcohol solution for three days and showed that this helped the plants survive the subsequent three-week drought. In response to alcohol, the plant activates the synthesis of the stress phytohormone, abscisic acid, which helps… Continue reading Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought

Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Bioarchaeologists from Spain and South Africa conducted a study of human and animal bones excavated in a Roman necropolis of the 2nd–3rd centuries AD in Barcelona. It turned out that most often the meat of pigs, large and small livestock was used as offerings, that is, species that were regularly eaten in everyday life. At… Continue reading Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Sahelanthropus was again allowed to walk on two legs

Paleontologists examined femur and ulna bones found more than 20 years ago in Chad. They concluded that the remains belonged to Sahelanthropus (Sahelanthropus tchadensis), who lived about seven million years ago. According to the researchers, the individual could move on the ground on two legs, but also climbed trees. This was reported in an article… Continue reading Sahelanthropus was again allowed to walk on two legs

Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Danish and British researchers have found that since Denmark banned industrially produced trans fats in food in 2003, the number of deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD) in the country fell by about 11 percent. The results of the work were published in the journal PLoS ONE. Trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids are present… Continue reading Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

People didn't want to help others after a sleepless night and daylight saving time.

After a night of poor sleep or no sleep at all, people consider themselves less willing to help others, American scientists found in laboratory experiments and studying the sleep experience of people at home. It also found that after daylight saving time, when people potentially lose an hour of sleep, they donate less than they… Continue reading People didn't want to help others after a sleepless night and daylight saving time.