Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Heterogeneous catalyst reduces the cost of synthesis of cyclic polymers

Chemists from the USA, South Korea, Hungary and Switzerland have developed a heterogeneous ruthenium-based catalyst for the synthesis of cyclic polymers from cyclopentene. They also managed to come up with a reaction installation that makes it easy to separate the catalyst from the reaction products. The study was published in Nature Chemistry. Linear polymers containing… Continue reading Heterogeneous catalyst reduces the cost of synthesis of cyclic polymers

Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

European physicists have studied in detail the interaction of single photons in a photonic crystal waveguide containing a quantum dot. They showed that by varying the duration of the pulses and their delay, it is possible to achieve varying degrees of nonlinearity, as well as control the degree of correlation of light quanta. The study… Continue reading Nonlinearity of quantum dot waveguide helps entangle photons

Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Chemists have found ideal conditions for the hydrogen borrowing reaction

Chemists from Russia studied the hydrogen borrowing reaction necessary for the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds. They found that it often does not require a catalyst at all, and also developed recommendations for successfully carrying out the reaction in the laboratory. The study was published in the journal Journal of Catalysis. Organic compounds containing an NH… Continue reading Chemists have found ideal conditions for the hydrogen borrowing reaction

Physicists have reproduced the chirping effect at the Kukulcan Pyramid

Colombian physicists have reproduced the unusual acoustic effect observed at the Temple of Kukulcan, located on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The echo of hand clapping at the base of the pyramid resembles the chirping or chirping of a bird. Simulations showed that this effect occurs due to the addition of many waves reflected from… Continue reading Physicists have reproduced the chirping effect at the Kukulcan Pyramid

Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Low-temperature phase transitions in ferromagnets are characterized by destruction of the domain structure. In an article in Nature physicists write that for a theoretical description of the dynamics of such transitions, it is necessary to take into account not only microscopic, but also mesoscale symmetry. This discovery indicates the possibility of the existence of non-classical… Continue reading Physicists have proven the importance of the mesoscale for quantum phase transitions

Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

British researchers have refuted the stereotype that people who smoke marijuana are more apathetic and unmotivated. They tested cannabis users and non-users for apathy and anhedonia, and conducted a series of reward-related behavioral tests. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups. A study conducted among adults and adolescents was… Continue reading Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

Chemists from Germany, the USA and Denmark have found that substances secreted by human skin lead to the formation of an oxidative field around it. Scientists placed four people in a sealed mock-up office and began ozonizing the air to a level close to the maximum permissible concentrations. The experiment showed that ozone interacts with… Continue reading Ozonation of the air caused the skin to create an oxidative field around a person

James Webb takes its first direct image of an exoplanet

The James Webb Infrared Space Observatory has captured its first direct image of superjupiter HIP 65426b as it orbits the yellow-white dwarf in a wide orbit. The image made it possible to clarify the parameters of the planet and prove the high efficiency of the observatory in direct observations of exoplanets. A preprint of the… Continue reading James Webb takes its first direct image of an exoplanet