Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

Australian sports doctors, with the participation of fifty runners, studied how compression socks affect the effects of running on the digestive system. After the marathon, those who ran in knee socks had lower levels of a protein marker of small intestinal damage. In an article published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Researchthe authors… Continue reading Compression socks protected the intestines of marathon runners from damage

The genome of the “immortal” jellyfish has been sequenced

Spanish scientists have compiled a list of genes that are likely responsible for the “immortality” of the jellyfish Turritopsis dohrnii. To do this, they sequenced its genome and compared it with the genome of a jellyfish. Turritopsis rubra. It turned out that the “immortal” jellyfish, unlike its relative, acquired additional copies – up to eight… Continue reading The genome of the “immortal” jellyfish has been sequenced

Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

American bioinformaticians have discovered traces in the genomes of mammals of 15 independent occurrences of new proteins responsible for the viscosity of saliva. According to the findings of the authors of a study published in Science Advancesthe culprit is a region of the genome with a high mutation rate and selection pressure during the evolutionary… Continue reading Evolution forced mammals to recreate salivary proteins fifteen times

Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought

Japanese geneticists have proposed increasing the drought resistance of plants using ethanol. They watered Tal's rhizomes (Arabidopsis thaliana) with a weak alcohol solution for three days and showed that this helped the plants survive the subsequent three-week drought. In response to alcohol, the plant activates the synthesis of the stress phytohormone, abscisic acid, which helps… Continue reading Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought

Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Chinese scientists have tested a new method of genome engineering: they have learned to stitch mouse chromosomes together. It turned out that if the chromosomes are not very large, then it is easy to glue them together and get a mouse with an odd number of chromosomes. Such animals can grow up healthy and fertile… Continue reading Chinese scientists have deprived mice of a chromosome. And then another one

Scientists introduced bacteria into artificial urine and obtained phosphate stones

Polish physicists and chemists modeled the formation of phosphate kidney stones using artificial urine and uropathogenic bacteria. Experiments in vitro in combination with computer modeling showed that the region of optimal pH values ​​(pH-optimum) for the formation of struvite, a component of phosphate stones, lies in the range of 8–9, shifting to the neutral side… Continue reading Scientists introduced bacteria into artificial urine and obtained phosphate stones

Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Bioarchaeologists from Spain and South Africa conducted a study of human and animal bones excavated in a Roman necropolis of the 2nd–3rd centuries AD in Barcelona. It turned out that most often the meat of pigs, large and small livestock was used as offerings, that is, species that were regularly eaten in everyday life. At… Continue reading Bioarchaeologists have discovered differences in the diet of men and women from a Roman necropolis

Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Danish and British researchers have found that since Denmark banned industrially produced trans fats in food in 2003, the number of deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD) in the country fell by about 11 percent. The results of the work were published in the journal PLoS ONE. Trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids are present… Continue reading Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Butyrate, which is produced by the intestinal bacteria Clostridium, may help people with severe peanut allergies. This was discovered by scientists who introduced polymer micelles with butyrate into the intestines of mice and relieved them of allergies. The authors believe that such micelles can also help with reactions to other food proteins. A preprint of… Continue reading Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies