The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

The Danuri probe, which became South Korea's first lunar probe, sent back to Earth the first image of the Earth and the Moon. Thus, engineers confirmed the functionality of the camera, which examined the far side of the Moon from an unusual distance, according to the website of the Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute… Continue reading The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

Astronomer Frank Drake dies

On Friday, September 2, 2022, at the age of 93, American astronomer Frank Drake, who became one of the pioneers of the search for radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations, died. He is also one of the creators of the records for the Pioneer and Voyager probes and the Arecibo radio message, according to the SETI… Continue reading Astronomer Frank Drake dies

Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

German physics teachers made a universal spectrometer in the Czerny-Turner scheme using LEGO constructors and scrap materials. The authors showed that it can be used to study the spectra of atomic emission, transmission, reflection and fluorescence. Reconfiguring the device for different tasks takes a few minutes, and the total cost of the device does not… Continue reading Spectrometer based on LEGO constructor will make studying physics cheaper

Bushfire smoke raised temperatures in Australia by three degrees

British climatologists studied the distribution of smoke in the stratosphere after bushfires in Australia in 2019–2020. They found that black carbon particles in the smoke increased the average temperature in the lower stratosphere by 0.7 degrees worldwide, with temperatures rising by three degrees over Australia. Additionally, the reaction of smoke and ozone has caused the… Continue reading Bushfire smoke raised temperatures in Australia by three degrees

The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

American scientists have developed a cloud platform that can assess the severity of pain in black laboratory mice. She analyzes the expression of the animal's face – the position of its nose, ears, whiskers and the degree of squinting of the eyes. Previously, researchers coped with this task manually, but, as the results show, the… Continue reading The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

Physicists from 13 countries presented the results of a study of the relative frequency of production of short-range two-nucleon correlations in the lightest mirror nuclei containing three nucleons. The data were obtained for a certain kinematic range during electron scattering by nuclei. The collaboration found that in light nuclei, neutron-proton pairs are formed approximately twice… Continue reading Mirror light nuclei differed from heavy ones in the frequency of nucleon pair production

An organometallic cocatalyst helped produce ammonia by electrolysis

Chemists from the USA have found a cobalt-based cocatalyst, which, together with a tungsten-based catalyst, makes it possible to effectively produce ammonia from nitrogen under electrolysis conditions. Thanks to this combination of catalysts, the process was able to be carried out at a relatively high potential of −1.35 volts and with a current efficiency of… Continue reading An organometallic cocatalyst helped produce ammonia by electrolysis

The Event Horizon Telescope saw the bend of the distant blazar's jet

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) has captured the most detailed image yet of the interior of the relativistic jet blazar J1924-2914, whose light took 3.5 billion years to reach Earth. It turned out that as it moves away from the core, the jet begins to bend, and toroidal magnetic fields can act in the region… Continue reading The Event Horizon Telescope saw the bend of the distant blazar's jet

People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Scientists from the UK and Germany examined the remains from a collective burial in a well, discovered in the center of Norwich, England in 2004. Radiocarbon dating showed that these people, many of whom were children, died between 1161 and 1216 AD. Paleogenetic research and historical evidence indicate that the remains belonged to Ashkenazi Jews,… Continue reading People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

The return of bison has made the prairie vegetation more diverse

The reintroduction of bison to areas of the prairie where they once lived but were exterminated by humans has a positive effect on the local flora, American ecologists have found. After analyzing the results of an experiment lasting about thirty years, they found that in the presence of bison, the species diversity of prairie plants… Continue reading The return of bison has made the prairie vegetation more diverse