Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Tea drinking linked to reduced risk of death from all causes

American researchers have found that drinking tea is associated with a decrease in mortality from all causes, and also found a relationship with a decrease in the likelihood of death from cardiovascular diseases, coronary heart disease and stroke. The results of a survey and medical examination of half a million Britons aged 40 to 69… Continue reading Tea drinking linked to reduced risk of death from all causes

Plant milk is inferior to cow milk in terms of micronutrient content

Chemical experts from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed 85 milk replacers from eight different plants and found that most of them were low in phosphorus, magnesium, zinc and selenium – micronutrients of which cow's milk is an important source. The exception was drinks made from legumes – in some of these minerals… Continue reading Plant milk is inferior to cow milk in terms of micronutrient content

Age and laziness increased the risk of developing cognitive dysfunction in dogs

Scientists from the USA have found out what is associated with the development of cognitive dysfunction in dogs. They included age, low level of physical activity, and a history of eye and ear diseases as risk factors. It turned out that lazy dogs risk almost 6.5 times higher than active dogs. The results of the… Continue reading Age and laziness increased the risk of developing cognitive dysfunction in dogs

Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Danish and British researchers have found that since Denmark banned industrially produced trans fats in food in 2003, the number of deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD) in the country fell by about 11 percent. The results of the work were published in the journal PLoS ONE. Trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids are present… Continue reading Denmark's trans fat ban prevented one in nine deaths from coronary heart disease

Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette

American researchers explained the biochemical basis of the influence of coffee on the effect of smoking the first cigarette in the morning: coffee components block receptors with high sensitivity and enhance the action of receptors with low sensitivity, which require more of the substance to activate, but which give a stronger response. The results of… Continue reading Coffee enhanced the nicotine effect of the first morning cigarette

Paleogeneticists read DNA from ancient Egyptian canopic jars for the first time

For the first time, paleogeneticists have sequenced DNA from samples of biological material extracted from ancient Egyptian canopic jars. Although the quality of reading in most cases turned out to be extremely low, in two cases scientists were able to determine the mitochondrial haplogroups of people: H and R0a1. Since they occur in both ancient… Continue reading Paleogeneticists read DNA from ancient Egyptian canopic jars for the first time

The most expensive drug in the world is a new therapy for beta thalassemia. One injection costs $2.8 million

The United States has approved gene therapy for beta thalassemia, an inherited blood disease. The developer of the drug, Bluebird bio, claims that one injection is enough to, if not cure, then significantly improve the patient’s condition. But such an injection would cost $2.8 million. This is 700 thousand dollars more expensive than the Zolgensma… Continue reading The most expensive drug in the world is a new therapy for beta thalassemia. One injection costs $2.8 million

The technology of a child from three parents was called safe for the embryo’s genome

Geneticists have tested the safety of spindle transfer from one egg to another before fertilization and called such a transfer safe. They obtained embryos from control and experimental eggs. The scientists then studied genetic and functional differences in the embryos. The study was published in the journal PLoS Biology. Mitochondria are organelles-energy stations: they form… Continue reading The technology of a child from three parents was called safe for the embryo’s genome

Medieval English monks suffered from intestinal parasites

Paleoparasitologists conducted a study of materials from two medieval necropolises in Cambridge. It turned out that the Augustinians suffered from intestinal parasites almost twice as often as ordinary townspeople. In total, scientists studied samples from 44 burials, 19 of which contained eggs of helminths – human roundworms and whipworms. This was reported in an article… Continue reading Medieval English monks suffered from intestinal parasites