Physicists have reproduced the chirping effect at the Kukulcan Pyramid

Colombian physicists have reproduced the unusual acoustic effect observed at the Temple of Kukulcan, located on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The echo of hand clapping at the base of the pyramid resembles the chirping or chirping of a bird. Simulations showed that this effect occurs due to the addition of many waves reflected from… Continue reading Physicists have reproduced the chirping effect at the Kukulcan Pyramid

The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

American scientists have developed a cloud platform that can assess the severity of pain in black laboratory mice. She analyzes the expression of the animal's face – the position of its nose, ears, whiskers and the degree of squinting of the eyes. Previously, researchers coped with this task manually, but, as the results show, the… Continue reading The algorithm determined the mouse's pain level based on its muzzle expression

Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Butyrate, which is produced by the intestinal bacteria Clostridium, may help people with severe peanut allergies. This was discovered by scientists who introduced polymer micelles with butyrate into the intestines of mice and relieved them of allergies. The authors believe that such micelles can also help with reactions to other food proteins. A preprint of… Continue reading Butyrate saved mice from peanut allergies

Simulated plankton surfed on turbulence and accelerated twice

Physicists and biologists from France and the USA have modeled the movement of plankton, which uses vortices in the water to move faster, riding them like surfers on waves. To do this, scientists derived the equation of motion of plankton, which measures the local flow gradient and changes its direction so as to swim upward… Continue reading Simulated plankton surfed on turbulence and accelerated twice

Metal glasses turned out to be partially liquid

Chinese physicists have studied in detail the internal dynamics accompanying the mechanical relaxation of metallic glasses at different temperatures. They analyzed its parameters in a variety of glasses and liquids, and also carried out detailed simulations of vitrified and liquid aluminum and lanthanum atoms. Scientists have proven that some of the atoms in metallic glasses… Continue reading Metal glasses turned out to be partially liquid

Physicists simulated militant Redditors with GameStop shares

European physicists used a large amount of data from the r/wallstreetbets subreddit, as well as the dynamics of securities prices, to understand the mechanisms of self-organization of a large number of people using the example of the scandal surrounding the unexpected rise of GameStop shares. The mathematical model they developed of a voter under the… Continue reading Physicists simulated militant Redditors with GameStop shares

Physicist mathematically fried an infinite cutlet

An American physicist simulated the process of frying an endless, uniform, thin cutlet. He tried to answer the question of how flipping the cutlet can speed up the process of fully cooking it. To do this, the author solved an optimization problem for modes with different numbers of revolutions. It turned out that just one… Continue reading Physicist mathematically fried an infinite cutlet

Chinese chemists simulated the filtration of smoke from an ancient goose lamp

Chinese chemical technologists have discovered that an ancient oil goose lamp could filter combustion smoke and reduce indoor air pollution. The design of the lamp makes it possible to reduce by almost 17 percent the amount of smoke entering the room when burning oil. The study was published in PNAS. The painted bronze lamp was… Continue reading Chinese chemists simulated the filtration of smoke from an ancient goose lamp

Cooling the atmosphere by one degree would require 10 million tons of sulfur aerosol annually

American climatologists simulated temperature changes when sulfate aerosol is sprayed in the stratosphere. Modeling showed that the method allows the atmosphere to cool by one degree Celsius or more by 2069. But this would require introducing 10 million tons of aerosol into the atmosphere annually. Such work is necessary to assess the risks and consequences… Continue reading Cooling the atmosphere by one degree would require 10 million tons of sulfur aerosol annually

Nepenthes has adapted to use the energy of falling raindrops to capture victims

One species of Nepenthes, a carnivorous plant common in the jungle, has evolved a mechanism that allows it to use the energy of raindrops for hunting. A drop of water falls on the leaf-cover of the plant and sends the insect sitting on it straight into the trap. However, it turned out that the mechanism… Continue reading Nepenthes has adapted to use the energy of falling raindrops to capture victims