Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

The initial height of the tsunami caused by the eruption of the Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai volcano on January 15, 2022 was 90 meters. These conclusions were reached by researchers from the UK, New Zealand, Croatia and Japan, who analyzed changes in atmospheric pressure and sea level and created nine models of a volcanic tsunami.… Continue reading The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

Microrobots made from human cells launched the regeneration of nervous tissue in vitro

American researchers have created spheroid mobile microrobots from unmodified living human cells. In the experiment in vitro with their help, it was possible to initiate rapid healing of nervous tissue. The work is available as a preprint on bioRxiv. The idea of ​​using living cells to create biorobots is very attractive, since such structural components… Continue reading Microrobots made from human cells launched the regeneration of nervous tissue in vitro

Neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed to be treated with Lindley's sap

Researchers in China were able to improve the behavior of mice suffering from dementia and Parkinson's disease, thanks to eupalinolide B, isolated from Lindley's bone marrow (Eupatorium lindleyanum). The substance suppressed neuroinflammation by reducing the activity of immune cells in the brain. Inflammation in the nervous system is considered a major cause of neuronal damage… Continue reading Neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed to be treated with Lindley's sap

Chilean ignimbrites explain the behavior of supervolcanoes before eruptions

British and American geologists studied the rocks of the Chilean supervolcano Oxaya and developed a model of the behavior of such volcanoes before eruptions. The ages of zircons and sanidines from the Miocene ignimbrites indicated a gap of 4.6 million years between the onset of magma emplacement into the crust and the first Oxaya supereruption.… Continue reading Chilean ignimbrites explain the behavior of supervolcanoes before eruptions

Y chromosome loss leads to heart disease in male mice

Male mice in which the Y chromosome was removed from their hematopoietic cells developed fibrotic changes in the cardiac muscle tissue with a further decrease in organ function. As scientists report in the article, published In the magazine Science, cardiac macrophages lacking the Y chromosome more actively triggered and maintained the process of myocardial fibrosis.… Continue reading Y chromosome loss leads to heart disease in male mice

Geneticists have taught plant cells to perform logical operations

Australian geneticists have expanded the arsenal of biocomputers – living cells capable of performing some logical operations. This time, plant cells were taught to carry out the operations YES, NO, AND, OR, and more complex ones. Article published in the magazine Nature Biotechnology. One of the areas of synthetic biology, which deals with endowing living… Continue reading Geneticists have taught plant cells to perform logical operations

“Spektr-RG” discovered an unusual symbiotic X-ray binary

Astronomers using the Spektr-RG observatory and other space and ground-based telescopes have discovered a new symbiotic X-ray binary system that has unusual properties. In 2019, the system experienced a large ejection of dust from the main star, which, upon reaching the compact object two years later, triggered an accretion burst and an X-ray flare. A… Continue reading “Spektr-RG” discovered an unusual symbiotic X-ray binary

Deep-sea hiatuses in Cenozoic sediments reflect changes in ocean circulation

Geologists analyzed 409 breaks in deep-sea sediments from Cenozoic times. Most of them turned out to be associated with the erosion and redistribution of sediments by sea currents. The formation of breaks in the southern Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans between 34 and 30 million years ago was explained by the researchers as the expansion… Continue reading Deep-sea hiatuses in Cenozoic sediments reflect changes in ocean circulation

Phantom fossils indicate nanoplankton resilience to ancient global warming

Paleontologists have studied rocks that formed during ancient global warming events 94, 120 and 183 million years ago and found numerous imprints of skeletal elements of coccolithophores, the main component of nanoplankton. These prints were long overlooked by paleontologists, so the authors of this study called them “ghost” fossils. It was previously thought that ocean… Continue reading Phantom fossils indicate nanoplankton resilience to ancient global warming