Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

The initial height of the tsunami caused by the eruption of the Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai volcano on January 15, 2022 was 90 meters. These conclusions were reached by researchers from the UK, New Zealand, Croatia and Japan, who analyzed changes in atmospheric pressure and sea level and created nine models of a volcanic tsunami.… Continue reading The January eruption of the Tonga volcano triggered a 90 meter high tsunami.

Weddell seals sacrifice their ability to dive to supply iron to their pups

Zoologists have found that female Weddell seals pass on large amounts of iron to their offspring through their milk. This helps the cubs hold their breath longer and dive better, which increases their chances of learning to forage for food on their own. However, the seals themselves end up with iron deficiency, which reduces the… Continue reading Weddell seals sacrifice their ability to dive to supply iron to their pups

Wrecks of a Spanish treasure galleon found near the Bahamas

Underwater archaeologists have explored the site of the wreck of the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de las Maravillas, which sank near the Bahamas more than 350 years ago. Among the wreckage of the ship, scattered over a distance of more than 13 kilometers, they found valuable personal belongings of the ship's crew members, as well… Continue reading Wrecks of a Spanish treasure galleon found near the Bahamas

Searchers for artifacts from the Battle of the Ice found a sapper shovel and a tin can

Wikimedia Commons Underwater archaeologists examined the waters of Lake Peipus, where the Battle of the Ice supposedly took place in 1242. As a result of this work, they discovered about 30 metal objects. Among them were items related to fishing, as well as an engineer's shovel from the Great Patriotic War and a tin can.… Continue reading Searchers for artifacts from the Battle of the Ice found a sapper shovel and a tin can

Two dozen “black smokers” warned of a possible imminent eruption in the Pacific Ocean

Scientists have discovered a cluster of “black smokers” in the Pacific Ocean – a hydrothermal field – located off the axis of the mid-ocean ridge. It turned out to be not only very extensive, but also high-temperature, which, according to researchers, indicates an imminent (within a few years) next underwater eruption in this part of… Continue reading Two dozen “black smokers” warned of a possible imminent eruption in the Pacific Ocean

Chinese four-legged robot walked along the bottom of the pool and gave a man a ride

Unitree Robotics demonstrated the capabilities of the B1 four-legged robot by completely submerging it underwater and riding a person who weighs more than 100 kilograms on it. Four-legged robots are most often proposed to be used in difficult conditions, where it is difficult for ordinary robots to move. This usually means difficult terrain, such as… Continue reading Chinese four-legged robot walked along the bottom of the pool and gave a man a ride

Marble head of Hercules discovered at Antikythera shipwreck

Underwater archaeologists have conducted new research at the site of the Antikythera shipwreck. After moving the stone blocks, they discovered the marble base of the statue, fragments of a ship, two human teeth, and a marble head, which apparently represents the missing part of a previously found sculpture of Hercules. This was reported in a… Continue reading Marble head of Hercules discovered at Antikythera shipwreck

Physicists have created a toroidal vortex of light

Physicists have experimentally obtained a stable toroidal vortex of light, similar to rings of cigarette smoke. To do this, scientists conformally transformed the solution of Maxwell's equation in the form of a tube of light into a solution that describes a toroidal vortex, and then used this transformation in practice. Article published in Nature Photonics.… Continue reading Physicists have created a toroidal vortex of light

Marine archaeologists have found an 11-meter 18th-century ship's rudder off the coast of Britain.

Marine archaeologists have discovered an 11-meter 18th-century ship's rudder off the coast of Britain, which was part of the 74-gun battleship Invincible that sank in 1758. Scientists managed to find this structure during a geophysical survey approximately 60 meters from the stern. The discovery was reported by the BBC. In 1744, the French launched the… Continue reading Marine archaeologists have found an 11-meter 18th-century ship's rudder off the coast of Britain.