In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Thousand-year-old remains of a man with XXY chromosomes discovered in Portugal

The remains of a man who lived more than a thousand years ago were discovered in Portugal. This adult was found to have a very wide ilium, malocclusion, and maxillary prognathism. Genetic analysis showed that the man had Klinefelter syndrome – he belonged to the karyotype 47, XXY. This was reported in an article published… Continue reading Thousand-year-old remains of a man with XXY chromosomes discovered in Portugal

Archaeologists have found a bronze cheekpiece in the Borre style in Novgorod

Archaeologists discovered a rare bronze cheekpiece made in the Scandinavian Borre style in the Trinity excavation site in Veliky Novgorod. The artifact was found during a study of cultural layers of the first half – mid-10th century. This was reported in a press release from Moscow State University. In 1932, the famous Russian scientist Artemy… Continue reading Archaeologists have found a bronze cheekpiece in the Borre style in Novgorod

Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

Archaeologists have radiocarbon dated a wooden bow discovered last year in Norway. It turned out that the artifact that melted from under the ice was about four thousand years old. According to researchers, this is the oldest bow ever found in Norway, as they reported on the Secrets of the Ice project Facebook page*. Climate… Continue reading Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

A rare case with six weights was discovered in Gnezdovo

Archaeologists excavated two mounds of the Forest group in Gnezdovo. In one of them there were no artifacts or human remains – only organic decay. The other contained several valuable items, including a battle ax and a knife. The most unusual find was a rare wooden case with a bone lid, inside which were six… Continue reading A rare case with six weights was discovered in Gnezdovo

Noble Scandinavians of the Viking Age liked beaver fur

Danish scientists, using microscopy and biomolecular methods, examined 15 samples of fur items found in elite Scandinavian burials of the 10th century. It turned out that several things were made from beaver fur. Since these animals became extinct in Denmark in the Early Bronze Age, this product was brought from other regions, possibly from Rus'.… Continue reading Noble Scandinavians of the Viking Age liked beaver fur

Archaeologists discovered a silver wicker braid in Gnezdovo

Russian archaeologists reported new finds made in Gnezdovo. During excavations at the site of the supposed harbor, they discovered an Arabic silver dirham from the late 9th century, and also found a number of artifacts at the site of a mound destroyed in the 10th century. Among other things, they unearthed a silver wicker braid… Continue reading Archaeologists discovered a silver wicker braid in Gnezdovo

Icelandic Vikings hunted puffins and guillemots

Paleozoologists examined bird bones discovered during excavations of a Viking Age settlement in northern Iceland. It turned out that local residents preferred to hunt puffins and slender-billed guillemots. Scientists believe that the birds were hunted mainly in the summer during the breeding season, after which they brought the prey to the settlement, where they were… Continue reading Icelandic Vikings hunted puffins and guillemots

Treasure of gold Roman aures was buried in Britain before the Roman conquest

British archaeologist Adrian Marsden reported the results of a study of a treasure found several years ago in Norfolk. The most valuable finds were ten Roman gold coins – aures, minted during the reign of Octavian Augustus. The researcher believes that the treasure was buried at the beginning of the first century AD, a couple… Continue reading Treasure of gold Roman aures was buried in Britain before the Roman conquest

Archaeologists have found in Gnezdovo confirmation of written evidence of the funeral rites of the Rus

Russian archaeologists have reported the first results of excavations in Gnezdovo, which began just two weeks ago. While exploring one of the mounds, scientists discovered the remains of a dog cut into three parts. This confirms the written evidence of the Arab traveler Ibn Fadlan, left after visiting Volga Bulgaria in the 10th century, about… Continue reading Archaeologists have found in Gnezdovo confirmation of written evidence of the funeral rites of the Rus