In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Archaeologists have discovered in Norway the shaft of a medieval arrow, the broken shank of which was repaired by a hunter using sinew. However, apparently, then he was unsuccessful again and his shot missed the target, burying the arrow for several centuries under snow and ice. As the Secrets of the Ice project team reports… Continue reading In Norway, a repaired arrow from an unlucky hunter was found that had melted from under the ice.

Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists presented the results of a study of three wooden sickles discovered during underwater excavations at the Early Neolithic site of La Marmotta in Italy. It turned out that these tools were made more than seven thousand years ago from oak and wood belonging to the rose family. Ancient people used resin from pine trees… Continue reading Wooden sickles more than 7,000 years old found in Italy

Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens

Archaeologists reported the results of excavations in Staraya Russa. This season they managed to discover the oldest city necropolis, dating back to the 11th – early 12th centuries, as well as two birch bark letters. In the text of the 54th letter, the author is a certain Donkey. Perhaps this is a version of a… Continue reading Archaeologists found a birch bark letter in Staraya Russa with a request to buy deer mittens

An ancient burial of a girl in a canoe found in Patagonia

Archaeologists have discovered an ancient canoe burial in the Argentine part of Patagonia. It contained the remains of a young and short girl, 17–25 years old, who was buried more than 840 years ago along with a ceramic vessel covered with white glaze and decorated with red geometric designs. This was reported in an article… Continue reading An ancient burial of a girl in a canoe found in Patagonia

The burials of eight male warriors and a female priestess from the era of early nomads have been excavated in Kazakhstan.

Archaeologists excavated three mounds from the era of early nomads in the West Kazakhstan region, which contained the remains of ten people who died at the end of the 6th – beginning of the 5th century BC. The burial ritual and accompanying grave goods suggested that the graves contained eight male warriors, a teenage girl… Continue reading The burials of eight male warriors and a female priestess from the era of early nomads have been excavated in Kazakhstan.

Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

Archaeologists have radiocarbon dated a wooden bow discovered last year in Norway. It turned out that the artifact that melted from under the ice was about four thousand years old. According to researchers, this is the oldest bow ever found in Norway, as they reported on the Secrets of the Ice project Facebook page*. Climate… Continue reading Onions that melted in Norway turned out to be about 4,000 years old

A rare case with six weights was discovered in Gnezdovo

Archaeologists excavated two mounds of the Forest group in Gnezdovo. In one of them there were no artifacts or human remains – only organic decay. The other contained several valuable items, including a battle ax and a knife. The most unusual find was a rare wooden case with a bone lid, inside which were six… Continue reading A rare case with six weights was discovered in Gnezdovo

Archaeologists 50 years later rediscovered the ancient Church of St. Cyril in Smolensk at the mouth of Churilovka

Archaeologists spoke about the results of the work of the Smolensk expedition. A study of the sandy defensive rampart showed that the embankment on Cathedral Hill, built in the first half of the 9th century, currently reaches 1.5 meters in height and more than six meters in length. In addition, scientists have identified a large… Continue reading Archaeologists 50 years later rediscovered the ancient Church of St. Cyril in Smolensk at the mouth of Churilovka

Prehistoric Britons crushed rare rock crystal and buried it

Archaeologists have discovered that during the early Neolithic period, Britons from Dorston Hill in western England processed rock crystal and used it to mark their burials. Prehistoric Britons mined rare crystals and moved them over long distances. At the same time, rock crystal was not used to make equipment or weapons, which indicates its symbolic… Continue reading Prehistoric Britons crushed rare rock crystal and buried it

Archaeologists have found European dishes and shoes at the Novgorod German Court

Pyotr Gaidukov from the Institute of Archeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences spoke about the results of excavations of the German Court in Veliky Novgorod. When studying the cultural layers of the 13th–14th centuries, researchers found more than two thousand objects, among which were lead commercial seals, ceramic and wooden dishes and other household… Continue reading Archaeologists have found European dishes and shoes at the Novgorod German Court