Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration can occur more quickly if nerve cells lack retromer proteins, which are responsible for breaking down toxic tau protein. This conclusion was reached by scientists who observed genetically modified fruit flies that produced human tau protein in 39 neurons of the eye. Tau protein itself already caused the death of nerve cells, and the… Continue reading Poor protein utilization contributes to neurodegeneration

The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

The Danuri probe, which became South Korea's first lunar probe, sent back to Earth the first image of the Earth and the Moon. Thus, engineers confirmed the functionality of the camera, which examined the far side of the Moon from an unusual distance, according to the website of the Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute… Continue reading The first South Korean lunar probe sent the first photo of the Earth and the Moon

Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Injections of a hormone from the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the development of the genital organs and is commonly used to treat infertility, have been able to improve cognitive performance in people with Down syndrome. This was discovered by European scientists who conducted a study on seven young men. After six months of living… Continue reading Hormone injections improve cognitive performance in Down syndrome

Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

British researchers have refuted the stereotype that people who smoke marijuana are more apathetic and unmotivated. They tested cannabis users and non-users for apathy and anhedonia, and conducted a series of reward-related behavioral tests. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups. A study conducted among adults and adolescents was… Continue reading Scientists disprove stereotype of lazy cannabis users

James Webb takes its first direct image of an exoplanet

The James Webb Infrared Space Observatory has captured its first direct image of superjupiter HIP 65426b as it orbits the yellow-white dwarf in a wide orbit. The image made it possible to clarify the parameters of the planet and prove the high efficiency of the observatory in direct observations of exoplanets. A preprint of the… Continue reading James Webb takes its first direct image of an exoplanet

James Webb finds organic molecules in icy particles around a very young protostar

The James Webb Infrared Space Telescope has reliably discovered a number of organic molecules, including complex ones, in the composition of ice particles in the core of the very young protovesche IRAS 15398−3359. In addition, the telescope examined the structure of one of the outflows of matter from the protostar, which consists of four shells.… Continue reading James Webb finds organic molecules in icy particles around a very young protostar

People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Scientists from the UK and Germany examined the remains from a collective burial in a well, discovered in the center of Norwich, England in 2004. Radiocarbon dating showed that these people, many of whom were children, died between 1161 and 1216 AD. Paleogenetic research and historical evidence indicate that the remains belonged to Ashkenazi Jews,… Continue reading People buried in an English well turned out to be victims of a medieval pogrom

Indian student tried to use friend's skin for biometric authentication

Police in the Indian city of Vadodara have detained two young men for trying to cheat their way into a local railway exam by using a fingerprint. One of the students cut the skin off his finger and gave it to a friend so that he could fool the biometrics system, NDTV reported. In 1877,… Continue reading Indian student tried to use friend's skin for biometric authentication

DNA dating back 30,000 to 70,000 years was found in a Levantine cave.

Paleogeneticists read DNA from Pleistocene sediment samples recovered from Israel's Sephunima Cave. In layers ranging from 30 to 70 thousand years old, they were able to find fragments of mitochondrial DNA from representatives of the deer and hyena families. These are the oldest examples for deposits originating from a region with a climate similar to… Continue reading DNA dating back 30,000 to 70,000 years was found in a Levantine cave.

Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought

Japanese geneticists have proposed increasing the drought resistance of plants using ethanol. They watered Tal's rhizomes (Arabidopsis thaliana) with a weak alcohol solution for three days and showed that this helped the plants survive the subsequent three-week drought. In response to alcohol, the plant activates the synthesis of the stress phytohormone, abscisic acid, which helps… Continue reading Watering with ethyl alcohol protected the rhizome from drought